Thursday, July 27, 2017

Disclosure, Ethics, and Other Difficulties Plaguing the Trump White House


“There are so many qualified men and women who wanted to serve this president, this administration and their country who have been completely demoralized and completely, I think, disinclined to do so, based on the paperwork that we have to put forward, divesting assets, the different hoops you have to run through,” Conway said. “This White House is transparent and accountable, and we’ve all complied with those rules, but it has disincentivized good men and women. I hope it doesn’t disincentivize Anthony.”  -Kellyanne Conway, july 27, 2017 [italics added]

dis·in·cen·tiv·ize

disinˈsen(t)ivīz/

verb

discourage (a person or course of action) by removing an incentive.

In what way does requiring disclosure remove an incentive? Requiring disclosure might very well dissuade or discourage a person who had something to hide from doing that for which the disclosure was a requirement, but how does it remove an incentive? Does Kellyanne conway think that randomly tossing five-syllable words into a conversation increases her credibility?

Malapropism notwithstanding, is Kellyanne Conway's point that a requirement to conduct one's affairs in an ethical manner discourages potential public servants from filling government positions? If so, I would view that as being clearly a positive effect of the requirement of public disclosure.

On Sunday, Kellyanne Conway debated CNN anchor Brian Stelter regarding the truth, lies, and scandals as conveyed by Donald J. Trump.

STELTER: "The scandals are about the President's lies. About voter fraud, about wiretapping, his repeated lies about those issues. That's the scandal."

CONWAY: "[Donald Trump] doesn't think he's lying about those issues, and you know it."

That's her best defense of Trump? Seriously?

6 comments:

  1. Maybe it was an alternative use of the word.

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    1. Maybe. Regardless, the woman is a piece of work.

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  2. She could have stopped at "Donald Trump doesn't think" and left it at that. Truth and ethics are quickly dying, but they were already on life support so who will notice?

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    1. All the nonsene going on is playing out like a bad competitive reality TV program.

      Has any president in history ever spent so many words on self promotion? Who else was still gloating about his amazing election win eight months later? Who else kept such track of his supposedly record-breaking crowds? Maybe before the days of intense media coverage, there were other such self-obsessed men in the white house, but I haven't seen compelling evidence of any of his predecessors having given trump any competition in that area.

      Washington WAS pretty screwed up before Trump arrived, but he's taken it to new lows. The idea of bringing fresh blood to DC was a noble one, but I'm not sure it could have worked under the best of circumstances, as a president coouldn't really make anything work without having built the relationships with other politicians that take time in politics to create. Bringing a megalomaniac into such power, however, was a virtual guarantor of catastrophe.

      If I were one of our nation's enemy states, I would be looking at this as an excellent time to attack.

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  3. Replies
    1. With all of trump's people who have lost their jobs recently, I'm not sure why kellyanne is still there. If the new Chief of Staff is, as has been reported, in possession of actual intelligence, perhaps he'll have her fired.

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